Funding

WHP has been funded by a mix of external grant funding, private donations, salary support and office space from the Center for the Study of Women in Society, the Office of the Vice President for Research, the UO Libraries, and the Center for Advanced Technology in Education.

The Wired Humanities Projects do not have the budget to offer fellowships, but we welcome the collaboration of faculty, students, and volunteers on our Mesoamerican projects.  Faculty seeking other digital services should now contact the new Digital Scholarship Center (DSC) in the Knight Library.  Beginning in Fall 2012, WHP will re-focus on its own Digital Mesoamerica projects, and will not compete with the new DSC by trying to offer services campus-wide.

Grant History

Go here to see our history of grants, where, since 2006 we have attracted more than $1.25 million in grant funding, the vast majority external federal funds, for various projects.

Current Grants

  • WHP has received funding for another National Endowment for the Humanities Grant for a Summer Institute for Schoolteachers to take place in Oaxaca, Mexico, in the summer of 2014.
  • Stephanie Wood was recently named for a minor role in a grant to Justyna Olko at the University of Warsaw funded by the European Research Council.
  • WHP is named in the Title VIa grant recently landed by the Latin American Studies program at the University of Oregon. WHP has been asked to spend two years developing an online Zapotec dictionary.

Prior Grants

  • Stephanie Wood, together with Alina Padilla-Miller (graduate student, SOJC) and Diana Salazar (undergraduate student) at the University of Oregon, collaborated with Richard Hanson of the Proyecto Trilingue in Oaxaca, Mexico, on a small grant funded by the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies, for a project called Culture, Exchange, Education, and Diversity aiming to build and archive conversations between youth in Oaxaca and youth in Oregon with Oaxacan heritage. Although the grant has concluded, we will continue to connect teachers to the Proyecto Trilingue through our summer institutes.
  • WHP has had a small part in the National Resource Center grant (2010-2014) that provides funding to the Center for Asian and Pacific Studies. The focus of our assistance had been on creating digital resources for faculty research in collaboration with the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art and the Knight Library’s Special Collections. The new Digital Scholarship Center will carry this forward.
  • Nahuatl Dictionary, 2009–12, but with a no-cost extension through June 2013. This is an NEH/NSF Documenting Endangered Languages grant for an online, searchable, trilingual Nahuatl-Spanish-English Dictionary, 2009–12.  Amount funded: $350,000. Co-Editors Stephanie Wood and John Sullivan. This is another project involving international collaboration between WHP and a team in Mexico, in this case, at a university in Zacatecas, Mexico. This dictionary aims to preserve and support modern, spoken Nahuatl today by providing native speakers with the first-ever dictionary that will give them a definition of a given word in Nahuatl.  Historically, all dictionaries were really vocabularies that translated Nahuatl to the language of the colonizing cultures.   This dictionary project also proposes to have interfaces that will support the translation of thousands of manuscript written in Nahuatl between about 1540 and 1840. This body of material represents an unparalleled resource across the Americas for seeking indigenous perspectives on history. Finally, the dictionary will also serve the needs of linguistics researchers, for it will combine historical and modern language information with information about vowel length, glottal stops, and will have a field that employs the International Phonetic Alphabet.  Between the two teams, we already have more than 35,000 headwords. Grant funds support both the team in Mexico and WHP, including our staff, students, and interns. Chris Doty, graduate student in Linguistics (now a Ph.D.) worked on the dictionary in 2011–12. We have made clones of this project for building additional dictionaries in other indigenous languages of Mexico, including Mixtec, P’urhépecha, Mayan, and Zapotec.  Spanish majors have the option of helping develop these dictionaries for PLE credit, through courses taught by Amanda Powell, Cecilia Enjuto Rangel, and Amalia Gladhart.
  • Digital Collection of Chinese Scrolls. We have received support from the East Asia Global Scholars group, who put out a call for proposals for research, travel, and course materials that would benefit a growing East Asian Initiative at the University of Oregon. Funding is for $2,000, which we consider as seed money to be parlayed into a larger grant once we develop the prototype.WHP is is adapting our Distance Research Environment for the close study of the details of two historical Chinese scrolls held in the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art collections. The resulting digital collection would be served open and free to the world to advance research and teaching. This annotation of the atomized scrolls is proposed to involve Professor Ina Asim (History), her graduate students and colleagues in China, plus undergraduates who will work with WHP. Stephanie Wood visited the Library of Congress on October 20, 2009, and met with John Hebert, Chief of Geography and Maps, who agreed to provide digital images of additional scrolls held there for future expansion of this digital collection. He also consulted on the potential application of Historical Geographic Information Science (HGIS) to the scrolls project, for many of the paintings have geographic dimensions.

Past Grants

  • Stephanie Wood, together with Alina Padilla-Miller (graduate student, SOJC) and Diana Salazar (undergraduate student) at the University of Oregon, collaborated with Richard Hanson of the Proyecto Trilingue in Oaxaca, Mexico, on a small grant funded by the Center for Latino/a and Latin American Studies, for a project called Culture, Exchange, Education, and Diversity aiming to build and archive conversations between youth in Oaxaca and youth in Oregon with Oaxacan heritage. Although the grant has concluded, we will continue to connect teachers to the Proyecto Trilingue through our summer institutes.
  • WHP has had a small part in the National Resource Center grant (2010-2014) that provides funding to the Center for Asian and Pacific Studies. The focus of our assistance had been on creating digital resources for faculty research in collaboration with the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art and the Knight Library’s Special Collections. The new Digital Scholarship Center will carry this forward.
  • Nahuatl Dictionary, 2009–12, but with a no-cost extension through June 2013. This is an NEH/NSF Documenting Endangered Languages grant for an online, searchable, trilingual Nahuatl-Spanish-English Dictionary, 2009–12.  Amount funded: $350,000. Co-Editors Stephanie Wood and John Sullivan. This is another project involving international collaboration between WHP and a team in Mexico, in this case, at a university in Zacatecas, Mexico. This dictionary aims to preserve and support modern, spoken Nahuatl today by providing native speakers with the first-ever dictionary that will give them a definition of a given word in Nahuatl.  Historically, all dictionaries were really vocabularies that translated Nahuatl to the language of the colonizing cultures.   This dictionary project also proposes to have interfaces that will support the translation of thousands of manuscript written in Nahuatl between about 1540 and 1840. This body of material represents an unparalleled resource across the Americas for seeking indigenous perspectives on history. Finally, the dictionary will also serve the needs of linguistics researchers, for it will combine historical and modern language information with information about vowel length, glottal stops, and will have a field that employs the International Phonetic Alphabet.  Between the two teams, we already have more than 35,000 headwords. Grant funds support both the team in Mexico and WHP, including our staff, students, and interns. Chris Doty, graduate student in Linguistics (now a Ph.D.) worked on the dictionary in 2011–12. We have made clones of this project for building additional dictionaries in other indigenous languages of Mexico, including Mixtec, P’urhépecha, Mayan, and Zapotec.  Spanish majors have the option of helping develop these dictionaries for PLE credit, through courses taught by Amanda Powell, Cecilia Enjuto Rangel, and Amalia Gladhart.
  • Digital Collection of Chinese Scrolls. We have received support from the East Asia Global Scholars group, who put out a call for proposals for research, travel, and course materials that would benefit a growing East Asian Initiative at the University of Oregon. Funding is for $2,000, which we consider as seed money to be parlayed into a larger grant once we develop the prototype.WHP is is adapting our Distance Research Environment for the close study of the details of two historical Chinese scrolls held in the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art collections. The resulting digital collection would be served open and free to the world to advance research and teaching. This annotation of the atomized scrolls is proposed to involve Professor Ina Asim (History), her graduate students and colleagues in China, plus undergraduates who will work with WHP. Stephanie Wood visited the Library of Congress on October 20, 2009, and met with John Hebert, Chief of Geography and Maps, who agreed to provide digital images of additional scrolls held there for future expansion of this digital collection. He also consulted on the potential application of Historical Geographic Information Science (HGIS) to the scrolls project, for many of the paintings have geographic dimensions.
  • Stephanie Wood held a Fulbright Specialists grant for collaboration in the development of Mesoamerican digital collections with the Ethnological Museum in Berlin, July–August 2012.
  • National Endowment for the Humanities Digital Enhancement Grant to further develop the Virtual Oaxaca project, now housed in the Smithsonian’s Latino Virtual Museum in Second Life, through Dec. 31, 2011.
  • Mesoamerican Cultures and their Histories: Spotlight on Oaxaca!  The NEH Summer Institute for Schoolteachers will take place in Oaxaca, Oax., Mexico, July 4-29, 2011.
  • WHP received a small part in a European Social Fund grant with Principal Investigator, Professor Justyna Olko, for a series of presentations and collaboration on Nahuatl.  The presentations have the title, “Encounters between the Old and New Worlds: Case Studies from the Aztec/Nahua Mexico,” 2010.
  • Digital Dissemination and Impact, “Virtual Oaxaca.” This supplement to the NEH Summer Institute grant provided $10,000 for developing a Oaxacan presence in Second Life (under the direction of Jonathon Richter, Director of the Center for Learning in Virtual Environments) where instruction could take place, incorporating documentary videos made by Professor Gabriela Martínez and inviting our participating teachers to showcase their curricular materials, 2010.
  • Mesoamerican Cultures and their Histories: Spotlight on Oaxaca,” 2009–10 — NEH Summer Institute grant. Amount funded: $185,561, through December 2010. This institute is aimed at schoolteachers from around the United States who wish to increase or enhance the Mesoamerican cultural and historical content in their curricula. Twenty-five teachers will meet in Oaxaca July 11 through August 7, 2010, to explore archaeology, ethnohistory, the arts, and film with the end goal of increasing international understanding and appreciation for the heritage of the growing numbers of Hispanic students in our schools across the United States. There will also be an optional technical track. This institute will have the involvement of faculty from the University of Oregon (Lynn Stephen, Gabriela Martínez, and Stephanie Wood) and Mexican colleagues (from such institutions as the Biblioteca Burgoa, the Centro de Investigaciones y Estudios Superiores en Antropología Social, and the Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia), with whom we hope to have increasing opportunities for collaborative research. Space for the institute will be provided free by the Fundación Alfredo Harp Helú (FAHH), in a gesture of co-sponsorhip and international cooperation.  The FAHH is also underwriting a new university in Oaxaca (La Salle) and has a growing interest in seeing the University of Oregon and this new university have an exchange agreement for both students and faculty.  This could have a far-reaching impact on Latin American Studies and Romance Languages at the UO, among other units. Digital curricular materials developed by participating teachers will be shared via the Internet.
  • Text-Image-Linking Environment (TILE), 2009–12 – This is an NEH Preservation and Access grant, for the “Text-Image-Linking Environment” (TILE), 2009–12.  Amount funded: $400,000 in all, with the amount to the UO being $14,000, for participation during 2010-11.  The goal is the creation of a tool that would be a new web-based modular image markup set for both manual and semi-automated linking between encoded text and image of text, and image annotation. WHP has a subcontract for this NEH grant because of an earlier NEH grant we held from 2006-2008, a Collaborative Research grant to create a digital collection of Mexican pictorial manuscripts and maps.  The manuscripts with which we work sometimes diverge considerably from European traditions, making them a useful case study in this cutting-edge digital humanities research project organized by John Walsh, School of Library and Information Science, Indian University Bloomington, and Dorothy Carr Porter of the Digital Humanities Observatory, Irish Royal Academy, co-PIs.  Also participating are Neil Fraistat and Doug Reside of the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities (MITH), University of Maryland. MITH works closely with the Oxford Digital Library and the E-Science and Ancient Documents project at the University of Oxford. Melissa Terras is one of the Oxford links, although her home department is Library, Archive, and Information Studies at University College London.  This grant places WHP in a highly regarded digital humanities group internationally and could lead to winning further grants. The tool that we gain from this project will also benefit all collaborative projects with UO faculty, such as the team developing the Gender in History Digital Resources Collection (in Romance Languages, English, Art History, etc.), or Professor Julee Raiskin (Women’s and Gender Studies) and her graduate students, who are developing a digital Travel Ads analysis project.
  • GIS Workshops at the University of Virginia. A team of four UO people, including Stephanie Wood and Ginny White of WHP, Karen Estlund and Jon Jablonski of the Libraries, received funding to participate in grant-funded workshop in November 2009 and May 2010 to increase our training in GIS.  WHP had already been working with Jim Meacham in InfoGraphics and Jessica Phelps, a graduate student in Geography, to bring HGIS to a growing number of projects at the UO that have geographic and historical dimensions, such as the Chinese Scrolls project.
  • “From the Yucatan to the Halls of Moctezuma: Mesoamerican Cultures and the Histories,” National Endowment for the Humanities, Education Division, Summer Institute for School Teachers. October 1, 2007 to December 31, 2008. $175,000. Supported a team of 12 staff, graduate students, undergraduate work-study students, and interns, while it also provided income for the Yamada Language Center for classroom and lounge space rental, and gave stipends to 26 schoolteachers from around the United States.

Funding Needs

  • Mapas Project Expansion. WHP currently seeks donations for the expansion of its Mapas Project, as we add dozens of manuscripts, increasing the representation of additional cultures and regions and so that we may reach back to include sixteenth-century pictorials and forward into the nineteenth century.
  • Age of Exploration Maps.  WHP has just begun a digital collection of maps from the European Age of Exploration that are in a private collection. These maps will provide excellent counterpoints to the indigenous-authored pictorials in the Mapas Project, and help demonstrate the evolution of cartography in the European tradition as well as highlight worldview and the construction of concepts of dominion and the “other.”
  • Virtual Mesoamerican Archive.  WHP seeks to update and expand its online finding aid, the VMA.
  • Project Space in Mexico. WHP seeks permanent office and project space in Mexico, where we have so many collaborative activities. Regions of focus for research, field work, and summer institutes currently include Oaxaca, Puebla/Tlaxcala, and Zacatecas.

Proposal Writing Assistance

WHP has provided proposal-writing assistance to various colleagues, including:

  • Daisy Williams, Architecture, 2011.
  • Ed Madison, Journalism, 2010.
  • Massimo Lollini, Petrarch Project, fall 2009.
  • Jon Jablonski and Karen Estlulnd, GIS workshops at the University of Virginia, summer 2009. Awarded, these workshops took place in November 2009 and May 2010.
  • Gabriela Martínez and Lynn Stephen, “Latino Roots,” a digital ethnography about Mexican migration into the U.S. Northwest, NEH Digital Start-Up Grant, late summer 2009.
  • Ina Asim, Digital Collection of Chinese Scrolls, summer and fall 2009.
  • Lynn Stephen and Amalia Gladhart, Title VI grant proposal, May 2009.
  • Gabriela Martínez, “Latin American Digital Audiovisual Archive,” NEH Digital Start-Up Grant, October 2008.
  • Carol Stabile, “Playing it Like a Girl: Gender and World Building in ‘World of Warcraft,’” NEH Digital Start-Up Grant, October 2008.
  • Barbara Altmann and Regina Psaki, “Galiens li restorés,” NEH Collaborative Research Grant, fall 2005.

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